Deploying on Heroku with Circle 2.0

heroku

#1

I cannot deploy to Heroku my application.

I cannot succeed in login through Heroku.
HerokuCLI is not found in the docker image.
I have no idea how to do it and I don’t find any useful documentation.

Any help, please?


#2

There’s a “Deployment integrations” page in the docs, there are examples there. I would suggest giving those a solid try first, and if you are still stuck, edit this question to show specifically what you have tried, and what error you get.


#3

I did that, I did read the documentation…

when I exactly follow: https://circleci.com/docs/2.0/project-walkthrough/#deploying-to-heroku
I got this issue
remote: ! WARNING:
remote: ! Do not authenticate with username and password using git.
remote: ! Run heroku login to update your credentials, then retry the git command.
remote: ! See documentation for details: https://devcenter.heroku.com/articles/git#http-git-authentication

help


#4

I still don’t see the code/config that you have tried - I am not in the habit of asking more than once!

What happened when you took the advice in the error message?


#5

That is my code:

I cannot run “heroku login” through circle (heroku not found on the docker image)

I believe I should not connect through heroku CLI but with heroku ssh
But that doc doesn’t help me


#6

OK, yes - you need to install it. Install this however you would install it on a Linux machine (distro repository, wget on a remote deb file, etc)

Four really helpful tips for CircleCI:

  1. Build containers are just like a blank VPS for you to do what you want. If something is not installed, then you need to install it.
  2. You can modify the base Docker image to whatever you like. You are using circleci/node:9-browsers at present - CircleCI has others, or you can use an image from Docker Hub. Don’t just use what you’re given - select something that has what you need. Once you get more comfortable with CircleCI, you can build and use your own if you wish.
  3. You can get started on the automatically written config file, but don’t keep it. Once you are happy with your config, rewrite it to strip out all the comments, and read up on the purpose of each command. Some of the commands are set to defaults and they can be removed. The reference manual is pretty good here: read all of it.
  4. CI is hard. If you are not familiar with Linux (or indeed the sheer bloody-minded persistence one needs to tackle hard problems) then practice those skills. Don’t give up and post a question after five minutes. Stick with it. Readers will help you here, but if you need one-on-one tuition, go get that - it could be a valuable investment. Your employer may pay for it out of their training budget.